What, When, Where & Who?

Saturday and/or Sunday Lunch

  • Bring your own lunch
    • Dine in one of Tieton’s three restaurants
        • ORDER FROM NANA KATE’S

If you would like to order lunch to be delivered Saturday and/or Sunday, you must call Nana Kate’s before 5pm the day before.

Click here for the menu.

Call (509) 697-4804
Order by 5pm the day before.


We couldn’t be more excited about the 2019 LiTFUSE Faculty! See for yourself.

September 27-29, 2019

Featuring Natalie Diaz

with Claudia Castro Luna, Saretta Morgan, Matthew Nienow, Dan Peters, Laura Da’, Maya Jewell Zeller, Christopher Howell, Cynthia Neely, Susan Blair, Thom Caraway, Ebo Barton, and Finn Menzies.

What?

LiTFUSE combines writing, exploration, improvisation, meditation, camaraderie, natural beauty and readings to ignite your muse.

When?

LiTFUSE is an annual weekend-long poets’ workshop that takes place in late September, just when the air begins to crisp and muses peek out from their apple crates.

Where?

Set among the fertile fields and orchards of central Washington, tryst with your muse where art mingles with agriculture in the quirky little town of Tieton (near Yakima).

Who?

Sponsored by Tieton Arts & Humanities, LiTFUSE is open to poets and muses of all ages and styles.

Connect?

Be social year round with LiTFUSE on Facebook!

LiTFUSE 2018

September 28-30, 2018

Featuring Kevin Prufer

with Katrina Roberts, Cindy Williams Gutiérrez, Jonathan Johnson, Christopher Howell, Jennifer Boyden, Kevin Goodan, Kimberly Burwick, Imani Sims, Joanna Thomas, and Gerardo Calderon.

LiTFUSE 2018 Faculty:

Kevin Prufer’s work, which has been praised for its elegiac attention to the banalities of the contemporary United States, includes In a Beautiful Country (2011), a finalist for the Rilke Prize and listed as a 2011 Notable Book by the Academy of American Poets, and National Anthem (2008), named best poetry book of the year by the Virginia Quarterly Review. Other collections of poetry include Fallen from a Chariot (2005), The Finger Bone (2002, reissued 2013), and Strange Wood (1997). A bilingual edition of Prufer’s poetry appeared in Germany as Wir wollten Amerika finden: ausgewählte Gedichte: zweisprachig (2011), selected and translated by Norbert Lange and Susanna Mewe.  Prufer’s many honors and awards include fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Lannan Foundation. He has received three Pushcart Prizes, awards from the Poetry Society of America, and the William Rockhill Nelson award. He is a professor in the English Department at the University of Houston and lives in Houston with his wife, the artist and literary critic Mary Hallab.


Katrina Roberts has published four books of poems, the three most recent all finalists for the Washington State Book Award: Underdog (2013); Friendly Fire (2008), chosen by Robin Becker for the Idaho Prize; The Quick (2005); and How Late Desire Looks (1997)Her work appears in anthologies such as The Pushcart Prize Anthology, Best American Poetry, and The Bread Loaf Anthology of New American Poets.  Roberts is the Mina Schwabacher Professor in English & the Humanities at Whitman College, where she directs the Visiting Writers Reading Series. She and her husband, Jeremy Barker, own and operate Tytonidae Cellars and the Walla Walla Distilling Company in southeast Washington State, where they live on a small farm with their three young children.


Cindy Williams Gutiérrez has been published in Crab Orchard Review, ZYZZYVA, The Grove Review, Minotaur, Open Spaces, among others. Her poetry has been exhibited in People, Places and Perceptions: A Look at Contemporary Northwest Latino Art at the Maryhill Museum in Goldendale, Washington; Women’s Stories: Voices of Eve at Galería Tonantzín in San Juan Bautista, California and in Women against Domestic Violence at La Oferta Review in San Jose, California. Cindy’s poems have won awards from the National League of American Pen Women, Oregon State Poetry Association and Washington Poets Association.  As the founder of the Miracle Theatre Group’s ¡Viva la Word! program, Cindy produced a bi-monthly Latino performance poetry series and directed the dramatization of contemporary Northwest poetry in Conquista and Rebellion in 2003 and Familia, Food and Fiesta in 2002. From 1997-1999, she was a literary arts facilitator with LifeLines in Menlo Park, California, where she collaborated with five other visual and literary artists to facilitate the creative expression of cancer patients and their families.


Jonathan Johnson’s fourth book, May Is an Island (poems), will be published by Carnegie Mellon University Press in Fall 2018.  His poetry has been published widely in magazines, anthologized in Best American Poetry, and read on NPR’s Writer’s Almanac.  He migrates between his Lake Superior coastal hometown of Marquette, Michigan; his ancestral glen in the costal Scottish Highlands; and Eastern Washington University, where he is a professor in the MFA program.


Christopher Howell’s newest volume of poems, Love’s Last Number, was released on February 14, 2017, by Milkweed Editions. Recent work may also be found in Field, Pleiades, Image, and the Gettysburg Review. His New and Selected volume, Dreamless and Possible, was chosen by Linda Bierds for the University of Washington Press’ Northwest Poets Series; and his Light’s Ladder, from the same series, won the Washington State Book Award in 2005. His poems, essays, and translations have also appeared in a number of anthologies and journals, including American Poetry Review, Antioch Review, Colorado Review, Crazyhorse, Denver Quarterly, Field, Gettysburg Review, Harper’s, Hudson Review, Iowa Review, Northwest Review, Poetry Northwest, Southern Review and Volt. He has been recipient of three Pushcart Prizes and two National Endowment fellowships, as well as a number of other awards. Chris teaches creative writing at Eastern Washington University, and in the low residency program at Eastern Oregon University, and is also director and principal editor for Lynx House Press.


Jennifer Boyden is the author of The Mouths of Grazing Things and The Declarable Future, awarded the Brittingham Prize in Poetry and the Four Lakes Prize in Poetry, and has a forthcoming novel, The Chief of Rally Tree (Skyhorse Press), which was awarded the Siskiyou Prize for New Environmental Literature. A former PEN Northwest Wilderness Writing Resident, she lived for a year of unparalleled solitude in a remote southern Oregon river valley where she wrote, fished, followed animal trails, and found good company in boulders. Jennifer earned her MFA from Eastern Washington University, and now teaches, writes, and lives on San Juan Island in Washington.


Kevin Goodan was born in Montana and raised on the Flathead Indian Reservation where his stepfather and brothers are tribal members. Goodan earned his BA from the University of Montana and worked as a firefighter for ten years with the U.S. Forest Service before receiving his MFA from University of Massachusetts-Amherst in 2004. In an interview with Goodan for Astrophil Press, poet Gregory Lawless noted the “breathtaking moments of solitude” of Goodan’s style, which “exhibits both pastoral eloquence and psychological intensity.” He currently teaches at Lewis-Clark State College and resides in Idaho.

 


Kimberly Burwick was born and raised in Massachusetts. Burwick earned her BA in literature from the University of Wisconsin, Madison and her MFA in poetry from Antioch University Los Angeles. She is the author of four collections of poetry: Has No Kinsmen (Red Hen Press, 2006), Horses in the Cathedral, winner of the Robert Dana Prize (Anhinga Press, 2011), Good Night Brother, winner of the Burnside Review Prize, (Burnside Review Press, 2014) and Custody of the Eyes (forthcoming from Carnegie Mellon University Press, 2017).  She is currently Clinical Assistant Professor of Creative Writing at Washington State University.


Imani Sims is a spicy Chai tea loving Seattle native who spun her first performance poem at the age of fourteen. She believes in the healing power of words and the transformational nuance of the human story.  Imani works to empower youth and adults through various writing courses and interdisciplinary shows all over the nation.  She is a 2016 Artist Trust and CityArtist Grant recipient, current Kitchen Sessions Curator: a performance art collaboration with Central District Forum for Arts and Ideas, Writer for On the Boards, 2016/2018 Gay City Arts Fellow and 2017 Center on Contemporary Arts Artist in Residence.  Her book (A)live Heart is available on Sibling Rivalry Press.


Joanna Thomas is a visual artist and poet living in the small university town of Ellensburg, WA. She is a founding member of PUNCH (2006-2016), an artist-run gallery located in the Pioneer Square district of Seattle; her collages and altered books have been included in exhibitions in museums, galleries and universities across the nation, including the Fort Lauderdale Museum of Art in Florida, the Edith Lambert Gallery in New Mexico, and Kent State University in Ohio. She has achieved signature status with both the National Association of Women Artists and the National Collage Society. Her poems have appeared in Ekphrasis, Otoliths, Picture Sentence, Found Poetry Review, shufPoetry, and several anthologies, including WA 129. In 2016, she founded the Inland Poetry Prowl, a weekend-long celebration of poetry featuring guest readers, open mics, craft talks, book fair, radio broadcast and film screening. Her dog’s name is Archie.


Rick Barot has published three volumes of poetry: The Darker Fall (2002), Want (2008), which was a finalist for the Lambda Literary Award and won the 2009 Grub Street Book Prize, and Chord (2015), all published by Sarabande Books.  Chord received the UNT Rilke Prize, the PEN Open Book Award, and the Publishing Triangle’s Thom Gunn Award.  It was also a finalist for the LA Times Book Prize.  His work has appeared in numerous publications, including Poetry, The New Republic, The New York Times Magazine, Tin House, The Kenyon Review, The New Yorker, and two editions of the Best American Poetry series.  He has received fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, the Artist Trust of Washington, the Civitella Ranieri, and Stanford University, where he was a Wallace E. Stegner Fellow and a Jones Lecturer.  He lives in Tacoma, Washington and directs The Rainier Writing Workshop, the low-residency MFA program in creative writing at Pacific Lutheran University.  He is also the poetry editor for New England Review.  His fourth book of poems, The Galleons, is forthcoming from Milkweed Editions in 2020.


Douglas Manuel received a BA in Creative Writing from Arizona State University and a MFA from Butler University where he was the Managing Editor of Booth: A Journal. He is currently a Middleton and Dornsife Fellow at the University of Southern California where he is pursuing a PhD in Literature and Creative Writing. He was a recipient of the Chris McCarthy Scholarship for the Napa Valley Writers’ Conference and has been the Poetry Editor for Gold Line Press as well as was one of the Managing Editors of Ricochet Editions. His poems are featured on Poetry Foundation’s website and have appeared or are forthcoming in Poetry Northwest, Superstition Review, Rhino, North American Review, The Chattahoochee Review, New Orleans Review, Crab Creek Review, Many Mountains Moving, Figure 1, and elsewhere. His first full length collection of poems, Testify, was released by Red Hen Press in the spring of 2017.


Gerardo Calderon is the Musical Director of Grupo Condor and Nuestro Canto, studied classical guitar at the Escuela Superior de Musica in Mexico City and music theory at the Portland Community College. As a professional musician, Gerardo has pursued traditional Mexican music, Latin American folk music and pre-Columbian music by performing with folk ensembles in Mexico, Canada, New England and the Pacific Northwest. Gerardo also makes custom pan flutes, rain-sticks, water drums, turtle boxes and bombos. His recent work at Miracle includes The Shrunken Head of Pancho Villa and Viva Don Juan.

 


LiTFUSE Program – 2018

Friday, September 28

10:30am – 7pm | Registration Table Open

Warehouse


11:00am – 2:00pm | Master Class with Cindy Williams Gutiérrez

Boxx Gallery

Poetry of Witness: Using Form to Spark the Political Imagination

Poets of witness “combine lyric art with historical material and political intervention,” according to political-poet Carolyn Forché.  How can we use poetry’s lyricism and form to testify against oppression and promote justice?  In this Master Class, we will explore how Martín Espada, Robin Coste Lewis, Craig Santos Perez, Kevin Young, and Patricia Smith use the poetic forms of litany, found poems, and persona poems to engage in political dialogue. We will write our own poems as an act of bearing witness and as a testament to the words of 15th-century mystic Kabir, “Without the song of testimony,/ the quarrels of this world won’t end.”


2:30pm – 5:45pm | Master Class with Kevin Prufer

Boxx Gallery

Music and Sense

Through close readings of published work, this discussion class will examine how the music of poetry contributes to the many ways in which good poems mean.  How can poetic music work in counterpoint to the more overt meanings a poem puts forward?  How can it contradict, undercut, or further poetic meaning?  Is poetic music paraphrasable? When it comes to meaning, how is the music of free verse different from the music of rhyme and meter?


5:30pm – 7pm | Dinner (for purchase)

Warehouse


6:45-7:05 | Faculty Reading/Performance with Kimberly Burwick

7:05-7:25 | Faculty Reading/Performance with Imani Sims

7:30-9:30 | LiTFUSE Slam 4 Page Poets, hosted by Imani Sims

Open to the Public & Free

Warehouse


Saturday, September 29

8am – 10am | Breakfast (for purchase)

8am – 10am | Registration Table Open

8:10am – 8:20am | Ingathering with Emily Gwinn & Carol Trenga

Warehouse Atrium


8:30am – 10am | First Breakout Session

The Lofts Gallery

Wisdom in Poetry with Jonathan Johnson

Those of us who read and write poetry all have our multiple, varied, and often conflicting reasons for doing so.  Paramount among my reasons is to more fully and gracefully occupy existence.  Often it’s the wisdom to be discovered in poetry—much of that wisdom common across eras and geographies and cultures—that I have found most instructive, comforting, companionable, and inspiring as I strive to more fully and gracefully occupy existence.  In this workshop, we will read, discuss, and celebrate three loose and often overlapping categories of wise poems: the directive; the descriptive; and the implicit.  As we range through poetic wisdom from around the world, our guides will include Nazim Hikmet, Mary Oliver, Pablo Neruda, Vera Pavlova, Jack Gilbert, the anonymous poets of the Kokinshū, Wisława Szymborska, and John Keats.  Then, we’ll turn our attentions to searching for our own wise poetic words.  To begin, please bring one sentence (yours or someone else’s) you believe is true and wise.

*           *           *           *           *

Boxx Gallery

Returning to Harlem with Douglas Manuel

In this workshop, we will revisit the works of Harlem Renaissance Writers like Georgia Douglas Johnson, Anne Spencer, Langston Hughes, Countee Cullen, and Jean Toomer and listen to the music of the era, in hopes of getting into a Harlem-state-of-mind. From there, we will write poems mimicking the forms and stylistic gestures of this fruitful period. We will write blues poems like Hughes, sonnets like Cullen, and poetic prose poems like Toomer.

*           *           *           *           *

Warehouse Ring Room

Poems of Innocence and Experience with Jennifer Boyden

Whether we are tying letters to trees or slingshotting a drink to the sky (believe me, it earned it), we’ll be making our way toward poems that use experience as a point of departure. This fun, experiential workshop is designed to get you writing by connecting one thing to an unlikely counterpart, resulting in moments of surprise and meaning.

*           *           *           *           *

Paper Hammer

Writing the Igloo with Kimberly Burwick

Consider the construction and purpose of the Igloo: a temporary shelter made of hard-packed snow and ice wherein one’s essential physiological needs may be met. This generative workshop will use the Igloo model to write poems out of the structure of “real nouns” (as Jack Gilbert calls them), carefully using our adjectival “snow saws and snow spades” to shelter the lifeblood of the poem inside this shelter.


10:15am – 11:45pm | Second Breakout Session

The Lofts Gallery

The Personal and the Political with Rick Barot

We’re living in tumultuous, grief-struck times, and poetry’s role as a catalyst for redress has never been more necessary. As we process each day’s onslaught of news, many of us struggle to reconcile our roles as artists, citizens, agents of resistance, conscience, and care. In this close-reading class, we’ll look at a handful of poets whose works illustrate the ways we might pivot—whether messily or fluidly—between the personal and the political, the private and the historical. The poets we look at will include Lucille Clifton, Danez Smith, Layli Long Soldier, and others.

*           *           *           *           *

Paper Hammer

Just the Two of Us/We Can Make it if We Try with Kevin Goodan

In this generative class we will examine poems written by two people (from call and response poems to chain poems, two-voice poems to blended collaboration), and using some of these as launch-points, we will join hands, we will stop, collaborate, and possibly listen a bit to what we create.

*           *           *           *           *

Warehouse Ring Room

Insisting on Joy: Poems of Reconciliation and of Loving the World with Cindy Williams Gutiérrez

Journalist Krista Tippett of The On Being Project counsels us to “insist on joy” and to “make the muscular choices of love and hope.”  If “poetry is the human voice,” as Elizabeth Alexander declares, how do we as poets lead the way toward enacting these choices?  In this class, we will study poems of conscientious-objector William Stafford and Japanese-American internee Lawson Inada and then dig deep to write a poem of reconciliation with an enemy or stranger.  We will also explore poems by Claribel Alegría and Mary Oliver and imagine our own to “keep loving the world” and to “announce our place in the family of things.”

*           *           *           *           *

Boxx Gallery

OB•LIT•ERATE: Jump-starting the Imagination through Redaction with Joanna Thomas

This workshop will explore the merits of redaction as a method for sparking the imagination, accessing the right hemisphere of the brain, restraining the flow of verbal vomit, and overcoming writer’s block. We will take a look at the “erasure poetry” of acclaimed practitioners such as Tom Phillips (A HUM UMENT), Ronald Johnson (radi os), Jen Bervin (nets), Jenni B. Baker, and Mary Ruefle and compare their varied approaches to the genre. Then we will do some erasing of our own. Please come prepared with a Sharpie or gel pen, but feel free to also bring art supplies such as colored pencils, gouache, or snippets of collage elements and a glue stick. Class size will be limited. We will provide source material, or, you can bring your own favorite piece of prose to obliterate.


11:45am – 12:45am | Lunch, Stretch, Visit, Shop Local

11:45am – 7pm | LiTFUSE Bookstore Open

Faculty books, other books from Blue Begonia Press & Cave Moon Press, and other Mighty Tieton/Paper Hammer merchandise.

12:50pm – 1:10pm | Faculty Reading/Performance with Christopher Howell

1:10pm – 1:30pm | Faculty Reading/Performance with Jonathan Johnson

Warehouse


1:45pm – 3:15 | Third Breakout Session — Track One

Paper Hammer

Feeling & Thinking with Kevin Prufer

What does it mean to say a poem feels? Relatedly, how do poems appear to enact the motions and currents of thought?  And how can we make use of the tools available to poets to create the joining of feeling and thinking that is essential to most successful lyric poems?

*           *           *           *           *

The Lofts Gallery

Re-Write the Future with Imani Sims

We will explore dystopian, fantasy, sci-fi, and mythic writing to form poems around family/community narratives that take place in the future. This could be forms of ekphrasis, dialogue poetry, and/or narrative poetry that bends time and space in an effort to create several parallel universes. Ultimately this class will be an opportunity for you to explore the future and perhaps the past, through poetry.

*           *           *           *           *

Warehouse Ring Room

For the Dearly Departed with Christopher Howell

A workshop focused on the poetry of NW poets we have lost in the last several years, including Madeline DeFrees, Denis Johnson, Vern Rutsala, Peter Sears, and Carolyn Kizer.

*           *           *           *           *

The Barn Room

The Elegy with Jonathan Johnson

In a sense, all poems are elegies.  At a certain point in your life, you realize that everything is going away all the time, including yourself and everyone else. Everything is an elegy. The most celebratory, ecstatic poem you can think of—say, Friedrich Schiller’s “Ode to Joy” as set to Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony—is an elegy because even as the choir is singing it, it’s going away.  But as our friend John Keats teaches us, full knowledge of the passing away of everything brings more awareness of everything.  Bring your grief to this class.  We will write poems to conjure the lost, to celebrate, and to mourn.


1:45pm – 4:15 | Third Breakout Session — Track Two: Master Class with Katrina Roberts (with Registration)

Boxx Gallery

WORD into WORLD

How can a single word open a door into the rooms of a new poem? “Go inside a stone,” says Simic, and in this generative workshop, we’ll play with words as river rocks – tumbling them, turning them to explore facets and furrows, stacking them, cracking them open like geodes to see what sorts of poem-drafts might emerge. Could rearranging letters spark poetic alchemy? Might a word divulge family history? Can we see words as palimpsests, or single links in chains reaching deep into wells, or as train cars bearing us onward? Bring a journal and your spelunking spirit. Through guided prompts and one-page books, we’ll knock on at least 3 “doors,” going inside words of our choosing, so we might resurface with handfuls of poem-seeds for future planting and blooming!


3:30pm – 4:30pm | Extra Breakout: Follow Your Bliss (No Registration Required)

The Barn Room

Love and Remembrance with Raul Sanchez

Explore the Origins of the Ritual based on cultural aspects of the Ancient Mesoamerican cultures whose vestiges remain as proof of their existence.  Participants will learn about the process of dying according to the Nahuatl culture as part of the cycle of renewal, along with the representatives of the Aztec Pantheon such as Tezcatlipoca, Mictlantecutli and Mictlantecihuatl.  Explore the current celebrations in Mexico and abroad, and reaffirm the reasons for the celebration and the cross-cultural aspects we have experienced as well as the unfortunate commercialism. Attendees will write poems based on anecdotes and remembrances addressed to those who they would like to remember based on the sample poems.


3:30pm – 4:30pm | Yoga Stretch with Sharon Noll

TBA


3:30pm – 4:30pm | OB•LIT•ERATE Discussion with Joanna Thomas

Boxx Gallery


4:40pm – 5pm | Faculty Reading/Talk/Performance with Rick Barot

Warehouse Main Stage


5pm – 5:50pm | Plenary Session with Cindy Williams Gutiérrez and Gerardo Calderon

Warehouse Main Stage


5:50pm – 6:30pm | Wine Down/Cash Bar

Take a few minutes to mingle and shop. All proceeds directly benefit Tieton Arts & Humanities.

Warehouse Atrium


6:30pm – 8:15pm | The LiTFUSE Poets’ Banquet

6:30pm – 7pm: Dinner is served

7pm – 7:20pm: Faculty Reading/Performance with Douglas Manual

7:20pm – 7:40pm: Faculty Reading/Performance with Jennifer Boyden

7:40pm: Keynote with Kevin Prufer: “On Reading Deeply and Strangely”

8:15pm – 9:30pm | The LiTFUSE Poets’ After Party

Warehouse


Sunday, September 30

8am – 10am | Breakfast (for purchase)

Warehouse Atrium


8:10am – 8:30am | Faculty Reading/Performance with Joanna Thomas

Boxx Gallery


8:30am – 8:50am | Faculty Reading/Performance with Cindy Williams Gutiérrez

Boxx Gallery


9am – 10:30am | Fourth Breakout Session

The Lofts Gallery

Workshop with Christopher Howell (Limit 12 poets)

Come workshop your poems.  Bring 12 copies of two poems (preferably double-sided to save paper).

*           *           *           *           *

617

Just Write the Damn Poem with Jennifer Boyden

Yep. It’s time: there’s a poem scratching on your door (even if you can’t hear it yet), and it’s time to let it in. We’ll start with an image, ask it some questions, and let it loose in your kitchen to see what it eats. By asking enough questions, we’ll eventually know what kind of animal it is, if it’s hopelessly feral or wants a tamable heart, and how to release it to its own logic once it’s good to go. Come prepared to write a poem that will surprise you with the urgency of its arrival.

*           *           *           *           *

Warehouse Ring Room

Entrances and Exits with Douglas Manuel

The purpose of this workshop is to inspire participants to construct stunning openings and closings for poems, so that you and your reader from the start are drawn in and at the end are left with a feeling, hopefully, beyond revelation.  As guidance for methods of exiting poems and as a resource for creative writing, we will consider poetry by Sarah Vap, Brynn Saito, Yusef Komunyakaa, Rainier Rilke, James Wright, and others.

*           *           *           *           *

Boxx Gallery

FOOD for THOUGHT with Katrina Roberts

Poets have celebrated what nurtures and sustains, torments and calms, transports us to childhood haunts or homelands, sends us lustily swooning, or groaning to hold our bellies. Food draws us; we sit with friends (or ghosts) around tables into wee hours. We stand stabbing takeout bean sprouts with only our reflections for company. We trek continents for sought-after ingredients, seek solace in familiar homey dishes. We prize kitchen implements, a smooth spoon great-grandfather hoisted brimming with purple borscht made from gems he dug from dirt. Food may trigger fears and disgust, too, our most gut insecurities – personal, societal, cultural. Together, we’ll feast on verse rich with rituals, and repulsions; associations, and affinities. A mouth might be mode to learn the world not only for babies and dogs, but for poets. We’ll drink with hungry eyes, and fill ears with sounds as we savor poems infused with such fodder; and in journals, we’ll whip up our own tidbits.


10:45am – 12:15pm | Fifth Breakout Session

The Lofts Gallery

Lavish Syntax with Rick Barot

The problem at the heart of writing a poem is the problem of dramatization. That is, how do we dramatize in language – an arguably limited means – the dynamics of thought, sensation, mystery, knowledge, and unsayability that often comprise human experience? In this close-reading class, we’ll discuss the crucial importance of syntax in vitalizing a poem. We’ll look at poems with powerful content and the syntactical correlatives the poets use in dramatizing that content. The poems will include the work of Louise Glück, Sharon Olds, Arthur Sze, and C.K. Williams.

*           *           *           *           *

Paper Hammer

Let’s All Ghazal! with Kevin Goodan

In this generative class, we will discuss the history of the ghazal, and the major advocate for the form in English: Agha Shahid Ali. Once we understand fully what is and is not a ghazal, we will look at both historical and contemporary ghazals, write our own, and, because a ghazal is a participatory poem, we will read our examples out loud to each other.

*           *           *           *           *

Warehouse Ring Room

Ritual Union with Imani Sims

There are three elements inherent in every ritual: 1. intention, 2. specificity, and 3. speaking. We will explore the creation of ritual through poetry. This will include repetition, extended metaphor, and reading aloud. As we create poetic ritual framed around themes that arise out of individual reflection, a theme will arise and guide the outcomes of the course.

*           *           *           *           *

Boxx Gallery

Past-Present-Past-Forward with Kimberly Burwick

As writers, we often need reminding that the images in our lives are fluid. Rarely do they exist in a vacuum of past, present or future. In this generative workshop, we will draft poems that push the boundaries of fixed images by crushing narrative and lyrical moments together.


12:15pm – 1:15pm | Lunch (for purchase)

Warehouse Atrium


1:15pm – 1:20pm | Announcement of 2018 Faculty/LiTFUSE Open Mic Sign-Ups!

1:20 – 1:40pm | Faculty Reading/Performance with Katrina Roberts

1:40pm – 2:10pm | Faculty Reading/Performance with Kevin Goodan

2:10pm – 2:30pm | Faculty Reading/Performance with Kevin Prufer

2:30pm – 3:15pm | LiTFUSE Open Mic

3:15pm | Book Signing/Registration/Chat/Farewells and Goodbyes

Warehouse

Register

Saturday and/or Sunday Lunch

  • Bring your own lunch
    • Dine in one of Tieton’s three restaurants
        • ORDER FROM NANA KATE’S

If you would like to order lunch to be delivered Saturday and/or Sunday, you must call Nana Kate’s before 5pm the day before.

Click here for the menu.

Call (509) 697-4804
Order by 5pm the day before.


LiTFUSE Workshop: Sept. 27-29, 2019 (includes the Poets’ Banquet): $250





LiTFUSE Balance (due Aug. 12, 2019): $120





Single-Session Master Class – Friday Sept. 27, 2019 (must be registered for LiTFUSE)

11:00am – 2:00pm with Claudia Castro Luna: $100



 


Single-Session Master Class – Friday Sept. 27, 2019 (must be registered for LiTFUSE)

6:30pm – 9:00pm with Christopher Howell: $50





Extra Poet’s Banquet Ticket: $50





2nd Payment Balance Due by Aug. 12, 2019: $120





Donate to LiTFUSE… Poets UNiTE!

Your generous donation makes it possible for poets with limited means to attend LiTFUSE through scholarships. Over the years, we have been able to invite many poets from graduate and undergraduate writing programs throughout the Pacific Northwest. These new and emerging poets are valuable members of the LiTFUSE community and, thanks to your contribution, we can continue to share this incredible Tieton experience with many more.


Donation




Paying by check is also an option. Please send the details of your selections and payment to:

Tieton Arts & Humanities
PO Box 171
Tieton, WA 98947

Call (509) 406-9444 if you have questions or concerns.


About

LiTFUSE combines writing, exploration, improvisation, meditation, camaraderie, natural beauty and readings to ignite your muse!

LiTFUSE is an annual weekend-long poets’ workshop held in Tieton, WA (near Yakima), wide-open & welcoming to poets of all ages and styles.  The mission of LiTFUSE is to unite poets from all over the Northwest and beyond, to open us to fresh voices and inspiration, and to deepen community with our fellow poets and artists.

LiTFUSE is a production of Tieton Arts & Humanities, a nonprofit corporation formed to raise understanding, appreciation, and visibility of the arts and humanities in Tieton and Yakima County, and to unite artists from around the State of Washington and the Pacific Northwest.

LiTFUSE was founded in 2007 by Michael Schein.  Our featured artists have been Susan Rich (2007), Lorna Dee Cervantes (2008 and 2014), George Bowering (2009), Ingrid Wendt (2010), Marvin Bell (2011), Christopher Howell (2012), Dorianne Laux (2013), Ellen Bass (2015), and Ilya Kaminsky (2016).

LiTFUSE is grateful to Ed Marquand and Mike Longyear for their vision in creating the Mighty Tieton artisan community where LiTFUSE thrives.

LiTFUSE is the creativity, joy, energy and love generated by its many poets, faculty, volunteers and supporters.

 

Current LiTFUSE Staff:

Director: Emily Gwinn (emily [at] litfuse [dot] us)

Assistant: Laura Walker (laura [at] litfuse [dot] us)

Core Team: Tieton Arts and Humanities Board and Director

Photo Credits: Opening of the Eyes Photography